Did you know -28 inventors killed by their own inventions

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Did you know - 28 inventors killed by their own inventions

Planetwide facts

1. FRANZ REICHELT - INVENTION: THE PARACHUTE

FRANZ REICHELT - planetwide facts

Franz Reichelt, an Austrian tailor, was responsible for inventing the parachute and, in 1912, He Created a garment that would allow humans to fly or, rather, float to the ground. With a concept similar to a parachute, Franz wanted to demonstrate his invention to the world by jumping from the Eiffel Tower, at a height of 60 meters. Unfortunately, Franz’s invention failed, and the tailor jumped to his death at a time recorded by huge press chambers that were filming the moment that might have been historic. the project then has been improved and is used worldwide today.

2. WILLIAM BULLOCK - INVENTION: THE ROTARY PRESS

William Bullock was born in the United States of America and given the name of William Bullock. Being responsible for the development of the rotary printing machine that allowed to develop the speed of printing of newspapers or books, this one ended up passing away victim of its own invention. As? When he set up his printer in the Philadelphia Public Ledger, Bullock attempted to kick a chain into place, causing his leg to get stuck and totally destroyed. Already in the hospital, during the operation to amputate his leg, William Bullock eventually passed away.

3. HENRY FLEUSS - INVENTION: THE PURE OXYGEN RESPIRATOR

Fleuss - planetwide directory

Henry Fleuss is the inventor of the oxygen tank we used to date, the problem is that he used pure oxygen when diving and testing his equipment 30 meters deep, which destroyed his lungs, since pure oxygen is fatal if inhaled in high pressure.

4. SIEUR FREMINET - INVENTION: THE RE-BREATHING DEVICE

SIEUR FREMINET - did you know - planetwide

Sieur Freminet tried to create a device that would allow the air to expire, probably for submerged work, but he did not know that we used the oxygen in the air we breathed, which caused the air circulating inside the device to become more scarce in oxygen, which caused Freminet to die practically asphyxiated.

5. MICHAEL DACRE AND THE FLYING TAXI

MICHAEL DACRE- planetwide facts

Michael Dacre was a British test pilot and pioneer for his invention, the “Flying taxi,” designed to provide a fast and inexpensive method of transportation between metropolises. He died in his own aircraft while doing flight tests. The plane crashed from the sky and the crash and explosion eventually took the inventor’s life. It reminds me that I should never take a “Flying Taxi”.D

6. HENRY SMOLINSKI

HENRY SMOLINSKI - did you kno - planetwide

Henri Smolinski was an aeronautical engineer who worked for the Advanced Vehicle Engineers in Los Angeles, responsible for the AVE Mizar project. This project had in mind the creation of the world’s first flying car by joining the rear of a Cessna Skymaster aircraft with a Ford Pinto car, which is why this invention is also known as The Flying Pinto. However, during a test flight on 11 September 1973, the right wing of the structure detached itself from the car, causing it to collapse and had an explosion that killed Henri Smolinski and his partner Harold Blake.

7. ANDREI ZHELEZNYAKOV

Andrei Zheleznyakov - planetwide facts

Andrei Zheleznyakov was a Russian inventor who worked on the development of chemical weapons, most notably the development of Novichok Nervous Agent believed to have been recently used in the United Kingdom to poison Sergei Skripal, a former Russian spy. But back to what matters, Andrei Zheleznyakov was infected by his own creation by wearing a defective protective suit but, even with the use of the antidote, he died seven years after the contagion victim of his own creation.

8. WILLIAM NELSON

WILLIAM NELSON- did you know planetwide

William Nelson who worked for General Electric. In the service of this company, William Nelson developed a motorized bicycle and, during a test tour, William Nelson fell from the bicycle while climbing a hill, which led to an immediate death.

9. HENRY WINSTANLEY

HENRY WINSTANLEY- did you know - planetwide

Winstanley was an English painter and engineer, being most remembered for building the first Eddystone lighthouse. He was so confident with the building that he manifested the desire to be inside the lighthouse during a storm. He got what he wanted, but the lighthouse did not withstand a huge storm that happened in November 1703, and ended up collapsing with Henry and five others inside.

10. ALEXANDER BOGDANOV

ALEXANDER BOGDANOV- planetwide directory

Alexander was a doctor, philosopher, economist, science fiction writer and Russian revolutionary. In 1924 he began experiments with blood transfusion, which he performed in himself. He stated that he had cured his baldness and improved his vision. Unfortunately the science of transfusion was young and Alexander did not examine the quality or donor of the blood that injected into his veins. In 1928 he received a transfusion of blood from his student suffering from malaria and tuberculosis and it was not long after. Bogdanov died, but the student injected with his blood survived.

11. COWPER PHIPPS COLES - INVENTION: SPECIAL DECK FOR WARSHIPS

COWPER- planetwide facts

Born in 1819, Cowper was an important captain of the British Royal Navy who invented the roundabout tower during the Crimean War. After the war Cowper patented his invention and began building his own ship using a revolutionary design. His new ship, HMS Captain, received several unusual and dangerous modifications that included a “drilling deck” that raised the center of gravity of the ship. On September 6, 1870 the HMS Captain turned and took with him the life of Cowper and most of his 500 crew.

12. KAREL SOUCEK - INVENTION: IMPACT ABSORPTION BARREL

KAREL SOUCEK2- did you know - planetwide

Karel was a Canadian stuntman famous for inventing the “capsule” (just a modified barrel) that he used to descend the great waterfalls of Niagara Falls. He survived, despite suffering from some injuries. In 1985 he persuaded a company to finance a drop of his barrel from the top of the Houston Astrodome, a large indoor stadium in Texas, USA. For the most dangerous feat in the world, according to Evel Knievel, an artificial waterfall was created that fell on a pool 55 meters below. However the feat went wrong and instead of the capsule hit the middle of the pool, hit the edge and was destroyed seriously injuring Karel. He resisted less than 24 hours.

13. OTTO LILIENTHAL

OTTO LILIENTHAL - planetwide directory

Otto was an aviation pioneer who became known as the Glider King. He was the first to perform repeatedly gliding successfully. Magazines and newspapers all over the world had their photos that influenced the public favorably toward the idea that aviation might one day come true. On August 4, 1896 something wrong occurred on Otto’s flight and he fell 17m breaking the spine. He did not bear the wounds and left the next day after uttering his last words: “Small sacrifices must be made.”

14. JOHN GODFREY PARRY-THOMAS

John was a Welsh engineer and racing driver. He developed the Babs, a car that was meant to hit Malcolm Campbell’s speed record. His new car had many modifications like a system of exposed chains that transmitted the engine’s power from the car to the wheels. On April 27, 1926 he fulfilled his dream by setting the record for 275 km / h, which lasted a year until it was broken again by Malcolm Campbell. As he tried to retrieve his title one of the chains broke away flying straight toward John’s neck, at very high speed, almost removing his head.

15. MIDGLEY - INVENTION: THE SYSTEM OF ROPES AND PULLEYS OF HIS BED

Thomas Midgley was the American chemist who invented the petroleum with the addition of lead and the CFC (Chlorine Fluoride Carbon). Despite being praised in his day, he is now considered the person “who had more impact on the atmosphere than any other organism in Earth’s history” and also the “human responsible for more deaths than any in history” due to their inventions.

He contracted polio from poisoning and became incapacitated in his bed. So he decided to invent an intricate system of pulleys and ropes that helped him get up. He lost his life just because he was accidentally strangled by one of the ropes of the same system that was meant to help him. You must have realized the irony of the fact that two of your inventions contributed to your downfall.

16. MARIE CURIE

In 1898, Marie Curie and her husband Pierre discovered the chemical element radio. Curie spent the rest of her life conducting different research on radiation and studying of radiation therapy. Her constant exposure to radiation led her to develop leukemia and led to her death in 1934. Marie was the first person to receive two Nobel Prizes in two different fields: chemistry and physics. She was also the first female teacher at the University of Paris.

17. HAROUTUNE KRIKOR DAGHLIAN JR. - INVENTION: ATOMIC BOMB

Haroutune Krikor Daghlian Jr planetwide - facts

Born in 1921 in the United States, Haroutune was an Armenian descendant who worked on the Manhattan Project (a team that researched and manufactured the first atomic bombs). He accidentally irradiated himself in August 1945 with a plutonium sphere, and died only 25 days after the accident. 

18. WAN HU - INVENTION: A CHAIR THAT WOULD TAKE YOU TO THE MOON

WAN HU - did you know - planetwide

Wan Hu was a sixteenth-century Chinese government official who worked during the Ming Dynasty. He had ambitions to travel to the Moon through a special chair that he himself designed. His intention was to light up 47 rockets stuck in his chair. But when he lit his chair, instead of the chair propelling the ambitious inventor into the air, the rockets exploded, killing the officer. GBAM!

19. ABU NASR ISMA'IL IBN HAMMAD AL-JAWHARI - INVENTION: WOODEN WINGS

Abu Nasr Ismail-planetwide fact

Born in present-day Kazakhstan, Jawhari was an author of an Arabic dictionary containing about 40,000 words. In addition to the dictionary, he was also known in Arab history for trying to fly with a pair of wooden wings that he invented. He jumped off the roof of a mosque in the old town of Nishapur to test his invention, but instead of flying he ended up smashing to the ground.

20. LI SI INVENTION: INSTRUMENT OF TORTURE "FIVE SORROWS"

LI SI - INVENTION -planetwide directory

Li Si was a famous coroner, calligrapher and influential chancellor of the Qin Dynasty in China, who lived between 246 BC and 208 BC. Li Si is also the inventor of a terrible torture method called “Five Sorrows” (or “Five Punishments”). According to Chinese history, in this brutal method the victim’s forehead is marked first, then the nose is cut, then the feet, after which the victim is castrated to finally be executed. The problem is that after the emperor’s death, Li Si was executed with his own invention.

21. THOMAS ANDREWS JR - INVENTION: TITANIC

Born in Comber, County Down in Ireland in 1873, Thomas Andrews was an Irish businessman, shipbuilder, managing director and head of the Harland and Wolff shipbuilding and drafting department in Belfast, Ireland. He was also the naval chief architect of the Titanic and was on board during his maiden voyage in April 1912. His knowledge turned out to be his greatest enemy, as he was among the more than 1,500 people who lost their lives in this famous tragedy, which later turned into film.

22. VALERIAN ABAKOVSKY - INVENTION: "AEROVAGÃO"

VALERIAN ABAKOVSKY - did you know - planetwide

Born in 1895, Abakovsky was a Russian engineer famous for inventing the “Aerovagão” – an experimental high-speed wagon equipped with an airplane engine and propeller drive (wow!). The invention was successful on its journey from Moscow to Tula, but on the way back to Moscow, the Aerovagão derailed at high speed, killing everyone on board, including the inventor himself.

23. AUREL VLAICU - INVENTION: METAL AIRPLANE

AUREL VLAICU - INVENTION METAL AIRPLANE planetwide directory

Known for the construction of the first metal airplane, Aurel Vlaicu died in 1913 by beating the Carpathian mountains in his own metal airplane, the “Vlaicu II”.

24. MAX VALIER - INVENTION: ROCKET CAR

MAX VALIER - did you know -planetwide

Born in Bozen in Austria in 1895, Max Valier was one of the pioneers for his experiments with cars equipped with rockets. In April 1930, he tested a rocket car, which was successful, but a month later he was killed when a rocket exploded on his test bench in Berlin.

25. HORACE LAWSON HUNLEY - INVENTION: A SUBMARINE

HORACE LAWSON- did you know - planetwide

Horace Lawson Hunley was a naval engineer and was the inventor of the first combat submarine, CSS Hunley, during the American Civil War. After two previous routine tests that failed, Hunley took command of the submarine, but after failing to resurface, he and the other seven crew members drowned. Hunley was buried with military honors at the Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, South Carolina.

26. JEAN-FRANÇOIS PILÂTRE DE ROZIER - INVENTION: ROZIER BALLOON

JEAN-FRANÇOIS- did you know - planetwide

Born in 1754, Rozier was a French chemist and professor of physics, and one of the pioneers of aviation. He invented the so-called Rozier Balloon, a hybrid balloon model that has separate chambers for two different gases, one unheated gas and one heated for elevation. However, while trying to cross an English channel in 1785, his balloon caught fire and he fell from an estimated height of 457 meters. Rozier and his companion died in the fall.

27. SYLVESTER H. ROPER - INVENTION: MOTORCYCLES AND RACE CARS

SYLVESTER H. ROPER - did you know - planetwide

Born in 1823 in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, SH Roper was a pioneer inventor and builder of one of the first automobiles and motorcycles that ever existed. He died of a heart attack after an accident with one of his inventions during a presentation of speed to the public in 1896.

28. PERILLOS OF ATHENS - INVENTION: TORTURE DEVICE "BULL IN THE GRAVE"

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